Food reviews - Shanghai, Uncategorized HONG KONG-STYLE RESTAURANT 1 February 2009


Hong Kong-style Restaurant
19 Yun Nan Road (South)
Shanghai, China
??—

This large, modern-looking restaurant is the next street down from us, making it really convenient for a quick lunch. It’s strangely called Hong Kong-style Restaurant – or at least that was it’s English name. Neat and clean inside, the service was equally as pleasant and efficient. What we loved most was the “Engrish menu” – it provided endless entertainment for us (yes, small things amuse small minds!). I’ve seen bad translations before, but this one COMPLETELY takes the cake. Some of the translations were utterly nonsensical, I find it hard to believe it really meant that in Chinese?? And surely they got an English-speaking person to check prior to printing it? It’s SO wrong that it looks almost intentional.. see the photos for yourself 😉

Chris opted for the mince meat chilli noodles which was average. The noodies had a nice bite, but nothing special and the mince meat sauce was a bit odd. It had a really strong chilli taste, like they’d just emptied a bottle of sweet chilli sauce onto the noodles. It was also so oily that I couldn’t stomach more than 2 bites.

My Yang Zhou fried rice was a delight. Served steaming hot and strewn with BBQ pork and veggies, it was fantastic comfort food and so tasty. Adored it, I’d go back for it again! Dessert was the irresistably described Chocolate peanut butter thick multi disabilities. I mean, how can you NOT get that? 😛 Turns out it was a slice of thick, soft toast.. with a generous spread of creamy peanut butter and a drizzle of liquid chocolate. I really liked it, but would have preferred it with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

A lovely (and pretty entertaining) meal for just 75? (US$11.00) for the both of us.


Hilariously cryptic menu

Engrish at its finest!

A total “what the?!” experience

Chris enjoys his Horlicks drink

My hot Horlicks

Some sorta mince meat chilli noodles. Tasty, but SO oily!

Yang Zhou fried rice – absolutely stunning.

We wanted some “multi disabilities”…. wtf?!

The Chocolate peanut butter thick multi disabilities *twitch twitch*

We decided to do the touristy thing and check out the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel. At 50? pp for a return trip, it’s really pricey considering the prices of other stuff around Shanghai. We’d actually expected a really blow-em-away trip through the 647m tunnel, but really it was this really cheesy, garish trip. First, they really packed us into the small shuttle, so you basically could only stand up straight and not move. Considering I HATE the way people push and shove, this already had me a bit riled up.

It was initially really exciting going in, with lots of running lights and looking quite impressive. But then some house music starts blaring and you get these cheesy light effects and random waving puppets. There are also (old and faded) movie screens playing something or other, which suddenly flip up as the shuttle passes through. It’s totally surreal.

When Chris and I got off, we sort of looked at each other and went “What…?!” It was THAT bizzare. It’s completely overpriced and not interesting at all inside, but you just gotta do the touristy thing once, right? 😛


At the top of the escalators leading into the Bund tunnel

The adorable little shuttles

Going into the tunnel….whoop whoop whoop!

Chris in his… attire.. so he doesn’t stand out like the whitey he is 😛
IT BE NINJA CHRIS!!!! This is us at the Pudong side, the other side of the Bund tunnel


Let’s Chat!




Let's Chat!

omg what a coincident! My other friend on LJ posted almost exactly the same pictures of the tunnel and at the same time too!

looks chilly over in Shanghai! Yummy food!

“The hemp burns water cooking a fillet” ????

Hah! I’d love to know what “stone harbors the onion bone” is. That’s absolutely brilliant.

omg what a coincident! My other friend on LJ posted almost exactly the same pictures of the tunnel and at the same time too!

looks chilly over in Shanghai! Yummy food!

omg what a coincident! My other friend on LJ posted almost exactly the same pictures of the tunnel and at the same time too!

looks chilly over in Shanghai! Yummy food!

“The hemp burns water cooking a fillet” ????

Hah! I’d love to know what “stone harbors the onion bone” is. That’s absolutely brilliant.

“The hemp burns water cooking a fillet” ????

Hah! I’d love to know what “stone harbors the onion bone” is. That’s absolutely brilliant.

Haha Is that really how Chris hides himself while walking around to avoid getting assaulted by the local Rolex peddlers and ripped off at the street markets?

in hongkong they call it ‘sai to si’ 西多士 which is their translation of ‘toast’ (i.e., fried bread)

somehow this restaurant’s translation went quite awry eh!

LOL! I bet they used an online translator (something like Babelfish or Google Translate) for the Engrish menu. Those tools usually translate Chinese words into the literal meaning of the characters.

Haha Is that really how Chris hides himself while walking around to avoid getting assaulted by the local Rolex peddlers and ripped off at the street markets?

Haha Is that really how Chris hides himself while walking around to avoid getting assaulted by the local Rolex peddlers and ripped off at the street markets?

How can they possibly translate a chinese word for some sort of food into “multi-disability” though?!?! It seems almost impossible!

in hongkong they call it ‘sai to si’ 西多士 which is their translation of ‘toast’ (i.e., fried bread)

somehow this restaurant’s translation went quite awry eh!

in hongkong they call it ‘sai to si’ 西多士 which is their translation of ‘toast’ (i.e., fried bread)

somehow this restaurant’s translation went quite awry eh!

LOL! I bet they used an online translator (something like Babelfish or Google Translate) for the Engrish menu. Those tools usually translate Chinese words into the literal meaning of the characters.

LOL! I bet they used an online translator (something like Babelfish or Google Translate) for the Engrish menu. Those tools usually translate Chinese words into the literal meaning of the characters.

How can they possibly translate a chinese word for some sort of food into “multi-disability” though?!?! It seems almost impossible!

How can they possibly translate a chinese word for some sort of food into “multi-disability” though?!?! It seems almost impossible!