Uncategorized Protected: The downpoints of being a woman 20 October 2002

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

12 Comments

  • Anonymous posted on October 20, 2002 at 4:29 am

    Ummmm….. I wonder what the stats would look like if this was done in Malaysian/Aisan settings? Worse? I’d think so. At least none of it says 0% :0.
    Shree

    Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 20, 2002 at 8:27 am

    Hi Beverly, it’s Jo-lynn from MUA. If you’re interested in women & economics, you should check out some of the writings by Charlotte Perskins Gilman. She was the first feminist sociologist and looked at why women at economically subservient to men.

    On a whole other note, did you receive the looong overdue pckg? God, I don’t even remember when I sent the candies off now….! Let me know, I just hope they didn’t get lost in the mail.

    TTFN 😀

    Reply
    • beverly posted on October 21, 2002 at 1:43 am

      I never really was interested in women issues and stuff.. but I was researching something for a Uni assignment and came across the Australia statistics page and saw that – and it surprised me!

      Anyyways, I haven’t received the chocs yet, bleah 🙁 But since they were sent surfacemail, it’ll probably take awhile.. I had a package arrive via surface mail 2.5 months after it was sent! :T But I’ll hang in there.. thanks so much for sending ’em!

      Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 20, 2002 at 12:13 pm

    Women careers

    A lot of times, I think the way women/men view careers has a lot to do with their childhood experiences and media expectations. While the idea of playing with dolls and house are instilled in little girls, boys are encouraged to play with cars and things they can take apart and explore. Even in media, it’s very rare you’ll see a girl who is a mechanical engineer or a computer scientist. People like to follow what society expects of them. It’s quite sad. :O(

    -Viv
    http://imagine.maybetomorrow.org

    Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 20, 2002 at 4:29 am

    Ummmm….. I wonder what the stats would look like if this was done in Malaysian/Aisan settings? Worse? I’d think so. At least none of it says 0% :0.
    Shree

    Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 20, 2002 at 8:27 am

    Hi Beverly, it’s Jo-lynn from MUA. If you’re interested in women & economics, you should check out some of the writings by Charlotte Perskins Gilman. She was the first feminist sociologist and looked at why women at economically subservient to men.

    On a whole other note, did you receive the looong overdue pckg? God, I don’t even remember when I sent the candies off now….! Let me know, I just hope they didn’t get lost in the mail.

    TTFN 😀

    Reply
    • beverly posted on October 21, 2002 at 1:43 am

      I never really was interested in women issues and stuff.. but I was researching something for a Uni assignment and came across the Australia statistics page and saw that – and it surprised me!

      Anyyways, I haven’t received the chocs yet, bleah 🙁 But since they were sent surfacemail, it’ll probably take awhile.. I had a package arrive via surface mail 2.5 months after it was sent! :T But I’ll hang in there.. thanks so much for sending ’em!

      Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 20, 2002 at 12:13 pm

    Women careers

    A lot of times, I think the way women/men view careers has a lot to do with their childhood experiences and media expectations. While the idea of playing with dolls and house are instilled in little girls, boys are encouraged to play with cars and things they can take apart and explore. Even in media, it’s very rare you’ll see a girl who is a mechanical engineer or a computer scientist. People like to follow what society expects of them. It’s quite sad. :O(

    -Viv
    http://imagine.maybetomorrow.org

    Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 21, 2002 at 11:54 am

    Career Women

    I agree with Viv. It’s rare you see a woman portrayed as an engineer or the head of a Fortune 500 company on t.v. Without someone to look up to, how can we teach our young girls that it is possible to break that glass ceiling? Just my opinion though.

    Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 21, 2002 at 11:54 am

    Career Women

    I agree with Viv. It’s rare you see a woman portrayed as an engineer or the head of a Fortune 500 company on t.v. Without someone to look up to, how can we teach our young girls that it is possible to break that glass ceiling? Just my opinion though.

    Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 23, 2002 at 3:52 am

    It is also for this reason that Asian Females end up marrying White men too, esp in Western countries.

    Asian women rise through the ranks faster than men do (White men choose those who are promoted…) It is easy to find examples of White men who have married Asian Women…Women usually want someone of at least equal standing….and only White men fill that criteria….

    For those who know New South Wales…Irene Moss and The Head of Macquarie bank is an Example. ….Rupert Murdoch and Wendi Deng for those overseas….

    Quite unfair, but what can you do?

    Reply
  • Anonymous posted on October 23, 2002 at 3:52 am

    It is also for this reason that Asian Females end up marrying White men too, esp in Western countries.

    Asian women rise through the ranks faster than men do (White men choose those who are promoted…) It is easy to find examples of White men who have married Asian Women…Women usually want someone of at least equal standing….and only White men fill that criteria….

    For those who know New South Wales…Irene Moss and The Head of Macquarie bank is an Example. ….Rupert Murdoch and Wendi Deng for those overseas….

    Quite unfair, but what can you do?

    Reply
  • Leave a Reply